Icelandic or Scandinavian Waffles have a special place in our cuisine, especially in Iceland and Norway.

The waffles differ from American and Belgian waffles in that they’re softer, thinner, and always heart-shaped. So, you might actually need a different waffle iron for this, but as the batter is different from your standard American and Belgian mixes, I’m sure you’ll be fine if you don’t have a Scandinavian waffle iron.

American, Belgian and Scandinavian waffle irons

The topping differs between countries, though. In Norway, eating it with brown cheese or sour cream and jam is most popular. In Iceland, we eat waffles nearly always with whipped cream and jam, or just jam.

You will find waffles in most, if not all, coffee houses in Iceland. They’re generally served with whipped cream and jam.

Ingredients of Icelandic Waffles

  • 150g (3dl / 1 ¼ cups) flour or flour and wholemeal flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 1 cup (2-3 dl) milk (Icelandic sour milk, whole or skimmed)
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 tbsp melted margarine or cooking oil
  • A few drops of lemon juice, vanilla extract, or other flavorings.

Method:

  • Heat the waffle iron.
  • Melt the margarine at very low heat or double boiler.
  • Sieve flour and baking powder with sugar and salt.
  • Mix a cup of milk into the dry goods until lump-free. Don’t mix too long because the batter will become too thick and chewy.
  • Add the margarine and eggs, as well as flavorings.
  • Let the batter stand for a bit; add milk if you think it is too thick. It is supposed to be thick, though, about double the thickness of Icelandic pancake batter.
  • Spread butter or cooking oil on the waffle iron, spread batter on it, and bake until golden. 

When taken off, spread them out to cool a little bit and then stack them.

Serve when new.

icelandic waffles, waffles,
Original public domain image from Wikimedia Commons
2 Responses
  1. Perla Asmundson

    I ‘m from Iceland and grew up there. Never heard of waffles there. Ponnukokur, Icelandic crepes yes, very traditional. Waffles, no. This must be a new thing.

  2. Helga Dís Björgúlfsdóttir

    Hi, Perla, very lovely to hear from you 🙂 Waffles have been a part of Icelandic society since at least the late 18th century. You will have to come back and taste the lovely waffles!

    Best regards,
    Helga from Your Friend in Reykjavik

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