Last year an eruption began in Fagradalsfjall in Reykjanes Peninsula. It was the first eruption in over 700 years in the area.

eruption in Reykjanes, fagradalsfjall
Berserkur, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

It quickly became one of the most popular eruptions in Icelandic history. It was an effusive eruption and relatively safe to walk up to. Some gas was emitted, of course. Occasionally, the ICE-SAR, in cooperation with the police and geologist from the University of Iceland, decided to close the walking paths due to high gas emissions.

Despite COVID-19 restrictions and thus fewer tourists than would typically have been here, record numbers of people visited the eruption site. And it was completely understandable. Not every day can you walk almost right up to an eruption, watch the lava flow and feel and hear the power of the earth this close to you.

Live-stream from Geldingadalir

Your Friend in Reykjavik, of course, went to the eruption site and live-streamed it for those who couldn’t see it in person.

In the videos, Valur, Your Friend in Reykjavik, discusses the then ongoing eruption, volcanoes in Iceland, and some of the folklore that’s connected to fire & brimstone.

Please note that these videos do not contain footage from the recent eruption in Meradalir.

The Fagradalsfjall’s eruption began on March 19, 2021, and ended on September 2, the same year. The eruption in Meradalir started on August 3, 2022, and ended on the 21st of the same month.

Your Friend in Reykjavik’s first visit to the eruption in Reykjanes
Your Friend in Reykjavik’s second visit to the eruption in Reykjanes
Continuing the second visit to the eruption in Reykjanes

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